106 East 21st April 10th
My Dear Abby I am now going to give you the contents of a
letter Maria received from Mrs Jenkins - April 7 [---?] Haven Vt
"My dear Miss Decatur - When I parted from your sisters company last
I promised if possible to call on you when we arrived in New York
or, if I could not see you, to write to you at my earliest convenience.
We left Bay Port Feb 4th and after a [----?] detention of five
weeks on the way & a wearing experience of [---?] perplexity & sea
sickness we arrived at New York on the 21st of March as I had
with me my Mother & two little [---?] [---?] found it impossible
to make my visits in new York [---?] took the earliest train
for Fray on our way to Vermont I regret very much I did not see
you both Mrs Parsons account and my own and should have written
to you some days since but have been prevented by illness.
I found it very hard to part with Mrs Parsons as I have become
most warmly & gratefully attached to both the Major & herself -
My thoughts go after them very frequently with a longing anxiety to
know how they are situated, and how they are in these days so
fraught with sorrow to our southern Land - I am sorry to say I left
Mrs Parsons feeble in health and depressed in spirits she has
missed her home sadly Major Parsons told me that he wrote you
a full account of their misfortunes & losses in July last - The experience
of those few days were very painful to us all I especially to your
sister but she bore it better than I should have thought possible
had I foreseen what was coming upon us - you are probably aware
that a few days after the breaking up of their home they started

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for middle Florida where Mrs Parsons remained until Dec
her baby was born in Monticelea two months after the raid
When I left Florida they were boarding at Brooksville. Your Brother
was there also. You would be delighted with your sisters children
little Johnnie is a bright active boy & [---?] pretty indeed & little Susie
is one of the sweetest of all babies & fortunately for her mamma
unusually good & quiet - My Mother urged Mrs Parsons to wean
her baby early & I hope she will not fail to do so - It will be quite
as well for the child as she eats nicely & very much better for your
sister who is quite too delicate to nurse her through the summer
months. I should be glad to think our national matters would be
come settled that she might come north soon. She has a
great longing for her friends and I think the change would be
of great advantage to her health. I am intensely anxious to know
what our southern friends think of their situation & prospects -
When I came away Major Parsons was very sure he could never take
the oath of allegiance to the United States. I am greatly
indebted to Major Parsons for his constant & unfailing kindness during
the last two long years & to your sister also for many favors & for the
earnest sympathy which has been called forth by our mutual trials.
I have not yet seen my husband but have applied for permission
to visit him and am anxiously waiting an answer - Permit me
to thank you my dear Miss Decatur for evy cheering word you have
written him during his wearisome captivity - Should I be permitted to
visit him in Boston I shall take the opportunity, while in Boston,
to call upon Lieut Decatur whose address Mrs Parsons gave me.

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As I am not quite certain of your address will you please let me know
immediately if you receive this. and also inform me if you have
heard from your sister since I left Florida? Should you desire any
farther information which I can give you I will gladly answer all
inquiries. I should have written more satisfactorily to you & to
myself had I know more definitely how much you have heard
from Florida during the past year - Hoping to hear from you soon
I remain Yours very Truly - L.C. Jenkins - " Now Dear Abby - you
may judge how anxious we feel about our dear Sister. She is very
evidently declining in health & if she does not come north she
will sink away soon. We are sorely tried about her being South so
long without a change - I wrote her last night and got a friend to
enclude my page in her letter to her Son who is a Capt B[----?] &
it was mailed this morning he is at "Yellow Bluff" fifty miles
beyond Jacksonville begging her to come on at once & if Jackson
will not come north with her my Husband was ready to go on
and receive her at Fernandina or Jacksonville saying her Husband or
Jackson could bring her & her Children to meet him. Begged Jackson
to write me at once what he would do so that William could
start without delay - Mrs B[---?] told her son how loyal I was & that
our Father & all my family had been & that all I asked of his
commanding officer was to let it pass his lines without delay as
I felt my sister was sinking for her family & change - Maria answered
Mrs J's letter at once asking her all the questions she, William & I could
suggest about them all & what comforts they needed & wether Sue
would come north without her Husband - it would indeed be cruel

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in the Major to sacrifice her poor child for his pride & stubborness
in not taking the oath of allegiance - he might as well do it
first as last - for the South cannot hold out much longer & they
might as well give in & have no more blood spilt - How does Thomas
feel now that the South will gain their independence? since
Richmond & Petersburg has fallan - I have written you once dear
Abby but your letter met with an accident so I commited it to the
flames & yesterday I was too much excited about dear Sue to do any
thing in the afternoon we were at Church in the morning - M[---?]
came around in the afternoon bringing Mrs J letter as I told her I wanted
it to copy to you - she again wrote Mrs Jenkins telling we had heard
so seldom from Florida that we knew nothing at all about them - The
Major wrote a letter to his brother Thomas last summer telling about the raid
& that we had received a nice letter from Jackson written in Jany & we
knew nothing more since that time but had been intensely anxious about
Sue - we hope to have an answer soon telling us how they are situated
and all indeed anything - well, dear Abby, I laid aside my pen & Oh!
Such glorious news surrender of Lee & his whole army to Grant terms of
surrender &c - you will see it all as I will send the paper to you
or some of you - I thank Almighty God that the war is now at an end
& what is there now to prevent the Major or Jacks from coming on at
once with Sue & children that she may be taken care of & her dear
little children - she never will go back again I think or at
least for many years - if she once gets on north - I hear the salute
at the Navy Yard of 200 guns. Oh, Abby, I am so elated & at our
victory - but there have I not always told you the South would never
gain their independence - they must give in - our streets, houses and stars
have looked splendidly ever since the taking of Richmond so many
flags flying from any window & balcony - also the shipping - Decatur & I
passed Saturday at Brooklyn with with my Southern friend Mrs Smith from N.C.
- she has given up long since - How are you all? give our love to Dr & Julia
who are on "tip toe" I know - Thomas & Eliza and family with Emily & family - I had
a nice long letter from my friend Mrs Otis the other day my love to them - Do
go to Thomas with my love & ask him to write to the Major at once & urge him
to come north with Sue - he can go back again if he prefers too and
you write to Abby - I shall write again tomorrow by another way to Sue
do write soon-kiss little Anna Decatur for her Aunt Anna & Ella too -
we begin to look like summer the trees & shrubs are all [---?] in Brooklyn some cherry
trees in bloom love from us all to you your affect Sister Anna -