Museum Exhibitions

Magna Carta exhibit comes to the UNH Law Library

Posted April 6, 2016

An exhibition about the Magna Carta is coming to the UNH School of Law in Concord from April 11 to April 22.

Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy, 1215-2015 is a traveling exhibit created by the American Bar Association and the Library of Congress. It is open to the public from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday. Groups larger than 10 interested in viewing the exhibit should contact Sue Zago, Law Library Director, for an appointment. There is no admission fee.

The exhibit includes up to 16 large banners with images of objects from the Library of Congress collections, an interpretive video, and other artifacts highlighting the impact of the Magna Carta on modern democracy.

In celebration of the visit, the law school’s chapters of the Federalist Society and the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy will be hosting a symposium, open to the public on Tuesday, April 12. The evening will begin with a reception with refreshments at 5:15 pm in the Intellectual Property Library on the 3rd Floor of the UNH Law Library in Concord. Lectures at 6:00 pm in Room 204 will follow. The exhibit will be installed in Intellectual Property Library for the event. RSVPs to Sue Zago are much appreciated.

Further details about the Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy, 1215-2015 traveling exhibit are available from the American Bar Association online. The exhibit is sponsored by the American Bar Association, Library of Congress, and Law Library of Congress.

New Museum Exhibit Celebrates Traditional Dance in NH

Posted January 15, 2016

Exhibit runs from January 15 to March 11, 2016, in the University Museum.

Gents Bow - Ladies Know How: Traditional Dance in the Monadnock Region, 1750-2015

The exhibit features the music, artifacts, and stories that document the long and continuous tradition of country dance in the Monadnock Region - from the days of the early settlers to the present.

Drawing on photographs, early records, stories, documents, and music, the exhibit will take the viewer on a journey from the community dances of the 18th century, kitchen dances of the 19th century, and the days of Ralph Page and his Orchestra in the 1940s.

Featured in the exhibit will be an audio compilation of music and text developed and curated by Randy Miller who wrote the authoritative book, The New England Fiddler’s Repertoire. A selection of materials from the UNH Library’s New Hampshire Library of Traditional Music and Dance will accompany the traveling exhibit.

The exhibit was created by the Monadnock Folklore Society and the Monadnock Center for History and Culture, with support by a grant from the NH State Council for the Arts.

The opening at UNH corresponds with the Ralph Page Legacy Weekend, an annual celebration of New England dance traditions dating back to 1988. To mark the occasion the exhibit, along with an accompanying sale of dance related books, periodicals, and sound recordings, the exhibit will be open from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM on Saturday, January 16th.

For information on hours or , visit our University Museum page. The University Museum is located on Level 1 in Dimond Library in Special Collections & Archives.

Whalebone to Steel: The Shape of Fashion

Posted September 3, 2015

September 18 - December 18

Take a peek at what lies beneath, in Whalebone to Steel: The Shape of Fashion, a new textile exhibition at the University of New Hampshire Museum.

Past exhibitions have focused on lovely gowns and surface details, but Whalebone to Steel: The Shape of Fashion, the latest effort by guest curator Astrida Schaeffer, lifts skirts and unbuttons bodices to reveal the true ‘Victoria’s secrets’ — the corsets, hoops, bustles and more, that shaped and supported the changing silhouettes of women’s clothes from the 18th to the early 20th centuries.

Some of the foundation garments displayed are designed to reshape the body, while some added to the body to change the profile. Early corsets and their precursors, called “stays,” were stiffened with reeds, cords, or whalebone (actually baleen) as a means of supporting the torso and bust. As technology advanced in the mid-19th century steel boning became the norm and the hourglass figure emerged as a result of steel’s shaping qualities.

According to Schaeffer:

Contrary to urban legend, that didn’t mean fainting ladies and rib removal; the exhibition makes the case that much of what we think we know about what it was like to live in a corset is a myth. In fact women lived quite active lives while corseted and could even be fairly athletic.

Where corsetry physically altered the body, hoops and bustles affected women’s shapes by building out artificially from it with cages of steel and other materials. The exhibition showcases a range of these items, as well as contemporary attitudes towards women's’ fashionably ballooning forms.

The core of the items on view comes from the Irma Bowen Textile Collection at UNH, which holds some 700 textile pieces donated to the university by Bowen. These pieces were originally gathered as teaching tools for the home economics dressmaking classes she taught at UNH from the 1920s to the 1940s.

In addition, generous loans from collections at the Brick Store Museum, John Paul Jones House, Museums of Old York, Strawbery Banke Museum, and the Wentworth Lear Historic Houses help fill out the story of how women’s clothes were shaped by their underthings.

The exhibition is sponsored by the University Museum and funded in part by the E.Ruth Buxton Stephenson Memorial Fund.

The University Museum, located in the Dimond Library, is open Monday through Friday, 12 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Wednesday noon to 8 p.m. Closed November 11, & 26 to 28.

Visit our Museum page for directions, parking information, photos, and more information on the exhibition and related programs.

Media contact: Dale Valena
University Museum, UNH
603-862-1081

Edwin & Mary Scheier Exhibit in Portsmouth

Posted April 28, 2015

April 30th – October 2nd, 2015
Edwin & Mary Scheier: Mid Century Modern New Hampshire Artists
UNH Museum Director Dale Valena, Guest Curator

Exhibit Location: Discover Portsmouth, 10 Middle Street, Portsmouth, N.H.

Experience a world of art and craft that began during the depression in New Hampshire. This is a collaborative exhibition with Portsmouth Historical Society, at the Discover Portsmouth Center. The collaboration is through the loan for UNH Scheier pottery through guest curator Dale Valena. There are around 80 pieces from private collectors and institutions such as UNH Special Collections, the Museum of Art at UNH, the Currier Museum of Art, and the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

“While the focus is on Scheiers’ Mid-Century New Hampshire years, we’ve gathered examples of their full careers as artists. The life and art of these two remarkable people is a great New Hampshire story, and we hope it delights and inspires!” explains UNH Museum Director Dale Valena, guest curator.

Ticketed gala opening reception will be on April 30th, from 5:30 to 8:00pm.

Upcoming Museum Exhibit

Posted January 20, 2015

Conflict Zone: Photojournalism from the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

January 26 - March 6, 2015 University Museum, Dimond Library, Level 1

The University Museum, with funding from the UNH English Department, will host an exhibit and related programs entitled Conflict Zone: Photojournalism from the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, a collection of images from the front lines and the post-war home front, captured by combat photographers and journalists, both military and civilian.

Conflict Zone was established in 2010 to honor Joao Silva, a New York Times photojournalist who lost both legs to a landmine in Afghanistan. Chris Hondros, Joao’s colleague and a Conflict Zone featured photographer, was killed in Libya in 2011. Conflict Zone is now dedicated to him.

A formal opening is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 5th at 5:00 PM, and will include an artist’s walkthrough by Nathan Webster, a Lecturer of English at UNH whose photography is part of the exhibition. Webster reported from Iraq as a freelance photojournalist from 2007-09. In addition to his Conflict Zone work, other examples of his photography will be displayed.

The exhibit will also include a reading and discussion with Elliot Ackerman, author of the upcoming novel Green on Blue. Ackerman has written for The New Yorker and Daily Beast and is a Marine veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan. Ackerman’s reading will take place Thursday, Feb. 26th at 5:00 PM at the UNH Memorial Union Building, Theater II.

Learn more at ConflictZone.org and ElliotAckerman.com.

For more exhibit information, contact Dale Valena, 603-862-1081, or Nathan Webster, 603-862-1313, Nathan.Webster@UNH.edu.

Astrida Schaeffer Book Receives Glowing Review

Posted November 25, 2014

Historical New Hampshire, a publication of the New Hampshire Historical Society, has published a most complimentary review of Astrida Schaeffer's book, Embellishments: Constructing Victorian Detail. The book, which includes over 70 color photographs, and a collection of Schaeffer's own "superb instructional diagrams and schematic drawings", is particularly unique because of the level of detailed instruction focusing on recreating Victorian clothing embellishments.

Interested readers may find Embellishments in the UNH Library. You may also see examples of textiles from the UNH Irma Bowen Textile Collection, and specific pieces from Embellishments: Constructing Victorian Detail, which have been displayed in a past exhibit at the University Museum.

Chinese Bamboo Script Exhibition

Posted September 24, 2014

Chinese Bamboo Scripts from Hunan: A Recording of Early Chinese Civilization

September 24th-26th in Dimond Library, near Circulation Desk on level 3
Sponsored by the Confucius Institute at UNH

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

For over 2,000 years, bamboo and wood scripts played an important role in Chinese history. The culture of bamboo script writing has had a far-reaching impact on Chinese civilization. The exhibition will display 60 pieces of bamboo and wood script replicas (excavated from Hunan Province of China) dating back to Qin, Han Dynasty, and the State of Wu during the Three Kingdoms Period.

The exhibition is organized in partnership with the Confucius Institute at Bryant University in Rhode Island, Hunan Antique Archaeology Institute, and Changsha Museum of Bamboo Scripts in Hunan, China.

To learn more about the exhibit, please visit the Chinese Bamboo Script Exhibition page, or find out more about the Confucius Institute at UNH.

Cooperative Extension Celebrates 100 Years

Posted September 17, 2014

September 18 - December 12, 2014
A new University Museum exhibit celebrates the 100th year of UNH Cooperative Extension.

The exhibit, "Bringing the University to You: A Century of Service to the Granite State," will be on display at the University Museum in Dimond Library.

Reception:
Thursday, September 18, 4:00-6:00pm with refreshments - all are welcome.

Exhibit Hours:
Monday - Friday, 10:00am-4:00pm
Tuesday, 10:00am-8:00pm

Visit the University Museum page to learn more about current and past exhibits.

New museum exhibit features faculty drawings

Posted April 10, 2014

The University Museum in Dimond Library presents its latest exhibition, The Art of Drawing: Works by UNH Studio Art Faculty. It runs from April 4 through June 14, 2014.

The art of drawing has always been considered a fundamental priority of the Studio Art Program at UNH. Guest curator, Craig Hood, says that he hopes this exhibition will give the university community and its visitors an opportunity to have a glimpse of a very basic component of what an art education means to faculty in the Department of Art and Art History.

For more information, visit the University Museum. The Museum is located on Level 1 in Dimond Library in Special Collections & Archives.

Celebrate Mardi Gras early with the new University Museum exhibition

Posted January 17, 2014

Mardi Gras isn't until March 4th this year, but the University Museum welcomes you to celebrate early with its latest exhibition, The Beat on the Street: Second Lines, Mardi Gras Indians, and the Photography of Gary Samson.

This exhibition of photographs and folk art focuses on the Mardi Gras Indians of New Orleans. This working class, African American tradition is distinctively part of New Orleans’s parade culture, and more broadly related to black Carnival celebrations throughout the world.

The exhibit runs from February 10 through March 28, 2014 with its formal opening on Wednesday, February 12, 2014.

The opening includes the showing of the film, Bury the Hatchet, which traces the Mardi Gras Indian tradition through the eyes of three “big chiefs” or leaders of these Mardi Gras Indian gangs. The event will feature special guest Big Chief Alfred Doucette of the Flaming Arrows, who also appears in the documentary. He will answer questions about the film and this centuries old tradition in a discussion moderated by Professor Burt Feintuch of the UNH Center for the Humanities.

The film and discussion will take place from 3-5:00PM at the Memorial Union Building, Theater I. An opening reception will follow the program at the University Museum, Dimond Library, Room 101, 5:30-7:00PM.

The exhibit will feature Mardi Gras Indian suits and art work, as well as the photography of Gary Samson, chair of the Photography Department of the New Hampshire Institute of Art. The exhibit, film, and reception are free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served at the reception.

The exhibition is underwritten, in part, by a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council.